President Farmajo Arrives In Sudan For Peace Agreement

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The president of Somalia’s federal government Mohamed Abdullahi Farmaajo a high-level delegation has arrived in South Sudanese capital, Juba on Saturday.

”Glad to be in Juba-South Sudan to witness the signing of the long-awaited Juba Peace Agreement. I commend the T.G of Sudan & Sudanese Revolutionary Movements for reaching this milestone. As neighbours, we greatly support a stable, united Sudan for the prosperity of our region,” president Farmajo said in a tweet.

According to Tut Gatluak, the South Sudanese chief mediator Somalia Kenya, Ethiopia, Chad, Egypt as well as the foreign minister of Saudi Arabia will also attend the event to formalize a peace agreement aimed at resolving decades of regional conflicts which left millions displaced and hundreds of thousands dead.

Sudan’s new civilian and military leaders, who have shared power since then, say ending conflicts is a top priority to help bring democracy and peace to a country in crisis.

The deal sets out terms to integrate rebels into the security forces, be politically represented, and have economic and land rights. A new fund will pay $750 million a year for 10 years to the impoverished southern and western regions and the chance of return for displaced people is also guaranteed.

The president of Somalia’s federal government Mohamed Abdullahi Farmaajo a high-level delegation has arrived in South Sudanese capital, Juba on Saturday.

”Glad to be in Juba-South Sudan to witness the signing of the long-awaited Juba Peace Agreement. I commend the T.G of Sudan & Sudanese Revolutionary Movements for reaching this milestone. As neighbours, we greatly support a stable, united Sudan for the prosperity of our region,” president Farmajo said in a tweet.

According to Tut Gatluak, the South Sudanese chief mediator Somalia Kenya, Ethiopia, Chad, Egypt as well as the foreign minister of Saudi Arabia will also attend the event to formalize a peace agreement aimed at resolving decades of regional conflicts which left millions displaced and hundreds of thousands dead.

Sudan’s new civilian and military leaders, who have shared power since then, say ending conflicts is a top priority to help bring democracy and peace to a country in crisis.

The deal sets out terms to integrate rebels into the security forces, be politically represented, and have economic and land rights. A new fund will pay $750 million a year for 10 years to the impoverished southern and western regions and the chance of return for displaced people is also guaranteed.

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